Tag Archives: collage/mixed media

Tiny House 9

Yes, another tiny house! I took another session of Build a Tiny House at the Smithsonian in July, 2022. Here is one of the houses I made.

It is larger than any other Tiny House I have made at about 15″. This is because I used a larger cardboard box as my base for the house. I can see that having more room to work with of course gives me more scope for architectural details and for decoration. And it makes me wonder about making even bigger, more elaborate ones…

I covered the box with black gesso and then used acrylic paints, markers, and collage for the surface decoration. Here are front and back views:

As you can see, it even has some stairs! (Not that they go anywhere, I just liked the idea of having stairs and I wanted to try out the techniques).

Here are more exterior views:

Here are some details from the exterior:

And details of the interior.

There you have it. Tiny House 9! Thank you to our instructor, Marcie Wolf-Hubbard, and classmates for a lot of fun.

Wordless Storybook Pages 11 and 12

In 2021 I completed a wordless artist book for my little granddaughter, who was about a year old at the time. I produced it by converting a discarded kid’s library book, using the same process I’ve used for similar books in the past.

Look here if you want to see more about how I make these books and to view one of my past books.

This particular volume does have a story, though. I had been working on it off and on for a long time and getting nowhere. Other projects kept coming along. One day I took it out to see about finishing it up and to consider what I might write to accompany the images. It struck me that it was fine just as it was, without words.

And I thought my granddaughter might like it when she is a little older, and she can make up stories to go with the pictures herself.

Like the content, the cover has no words. The book has no title. I guess it can be called whatever the reader wants.

Here are the next two pages. Want to make up your own story?

*********

Wordless Storybook Pages 9 and 10

In 2021 I completed a wordless artist book for my little granddaughter, who was about a year old at the time. I produced it by converting a discarded kid’s library book, using the same process I’ve used for similar books in the past.

Look here if you want to see more about how I make these books and to view one of my past books.

This particular volume does have a story, though. I had been working on it off and on for a long time and getting nowhere. Other projects kept coming along. One day I took it out to see about finishing it up and to consider what I might write to accompany the images. It struck me that it was fine just as it was, without words.

And I thought my granddaughter might like it when she is a little older, and she can make up stories to go with the pictures herself.

Like the content, the cover has no words. The book has no title. I guess it can be called whatever the reader wants.

Here are the next two pages. Want to make up your own story?

*********

Wordless Storybook Pages 7 and 8

In 2021 I completed a wordless artist book for my little granddaughter, who was about a year old at the time. I produced it by converting a discarded kid’s library book, using the same process I’ve used for similar books in the past.

Look here if you want to see more about how I make these books and to view one of my past books.

This particular volume does have a story, though. I had been working on it off and on for a long time and getting nowhere. Other projects kept coming along. One day I took it out to see about finishing it up and to consider what I might write to accompany the images. It struck me that it was fine just as it was, without words.

And I thought my granddaughter might like it when she is a little older, and she can make up stories to go with the pictures herself.

Like the content, the cover has no words. The book has no title. I guess it can be called whatever the reader wants.

Here are the next two pages. Want to make up your own story?

*********

Wordless Storybook Pages 5 and 6

In 2021 I completed a wordless artist book for my little granddaughter, who was about a year old at the time. I produced it by converting a discarded kid’s library book, using the same process I’ve used for similar books in the past.

Look here if you want to see more about how I make these books and to view one of my past books.

This particular volume does have a story, though. I had been working on it off and on for a long time and getting nowhere. Other projects kept coming along. One day I took it out to see about finishing it up and to consider what I might write to accompany the images. It struck me that it was fine just as it was, without words.

And I thought my granddaughter might like it when she is a little older, and she can make up stories to go with the pictures herself.

Like the content, the cover has no words. The book has no title. I guess it can be called whatever the reader wants.

Here are the next two pages. Want to make up your own story?

*********

Tiny House 8

You’ve seen the Tiny House I made for my friend Diane (Tiny House 6) and the one I made for her grandson (Tiny House 7). Now, here is Tiny House 8, made for Diane’s sister Lynne.

Lynne and I live many miles apart (think Pennsylvania and South Dakota) and we have never met in person. But…we both share an interest in dollhouses, something we found out when Diane invited her to the Zoom “reception” my Tiny House Class had online back in the winter. We began a correspondence based on our mutual interests and things went on from there.

So, I made her a house and sent it to her, as a surprise. Diane had showed her the one I made for her when Lynne made a visit east, and told me she liked it. It seemed natural to create one for her, so I did, and sent it as a surprise.

It arrived at Lynne’s house and coincidentally Lynne called Diane to tell her that the Tiny House had arrived as Diane and I were talking on a Zoom chat. We all marveled at how this circle had expanded to include us all.

All right. Let’s see the Tiny House 8. Here is the front.

Here is the interior/back.

Here’s a view of the back yard:

Here are some side and exterior views.

Here is another view of the interior:

Here are some other details:

So, that’s Tiny House 8. And a village made for friends has been created!

Wordless Storybook Pages 3 and 4

In 2021 I completed a wordless artist book for my little granddaughter, who was about a year old at the time. I produced it by converting a discarded kid’s library book, using the same process I’ve used for similar books in the past.

Look here if you want to see more about how I make these books and to view one of my past books.

This particular volume does have a story, though. I had been working on it off and on for a long time and getting nowhere. Other projects kept coming along. One day I took it out to see about finishing it up and to consider what I might write to accompany the images. It struck me that it was fine just as it was, without words.

And I thought my granddaughter might like it when she is a little older, and she can make up stories to go with the pictures herself.

Like the content, the cover has no words. The book has no title. I guess it can be called whatever the reader wants.

Here are the next two pages. Want to make up your own story?

*********

Wordless Storybook Pages 1 and 2

Front Cover

In 2021 I completed a wordless artist book for my little granddaughter, who was about a year old at the time. I produced it by converting a discarded kid’s library book, using the same process I’ve used for similar books in the past.

Look here if you want to see more about how I make these books and to view one of my past books.

This particular volume does have a story, though. I had been working on it off and on for a long time and getting nowhere. Other projects kept coming along. One day I took it out to see about finishing it up and to consider what I might write to accompany the images. It struck me that it was fine just as it was, without words.

And I thought my granddaughter might like it when she is a little older, and she can make up stories to go with the pictures herself.

Like the content, the cover has no words. The book has no title. I guess it can be called whatever the reader wants.

Back cover

Here are the first two pages. Want to make up your own story?

Collage and Memories

Last week I attended an online workshop at the National Gallery Art as part of their Virtual Studio series. You may remember I’ve done several of these sessions. They are offered every couple of weeks and are free. I’m a real fan of these classes and have enjoyed myself in each one.

Here is the email address to put yourself on the list for notifications about future events : virtualstudio@nga.gov .

On this afternoon, the theme was Storytelling with Collage (look here for the description of the program). I was interested to see what we’d be doing because as you know, I have spent a lot of my art career in doing collage and I always want to learn more.

First of all, we selected a memory that we’d like to depict in collage – any memory or experience, a big theme or a small moment. I was not prepared to come up with something and panicked. Then, I thought of the activity that is my lifelong favorite: reading. I am an avid reader and once I learned to read I have gone full speed ahead, often reading one book a day (sometimes more).

We then spent a few minutes writing down phrases or sketching pictures to support this memory theme. During this time, I found a focus: I especially love to read in bed and I have been doing it since childhood. I decided to depict me in bed with a book.

Next, we spent some time looking at a collage by Romare Bearden titled Tomorrow I May Be Far Away. Click here to see it in the museum’s collection.

Then, we started to work on our collages, with the instructor guiding us through the process. Since I was familiar with working in this medium, I listened, but mostly I worked really really fast on my image. I’m usually messy when I work in collage, but on this occasion I outdid myself – I was discarding papers on the floor and cutting and pasting and moving so quickly that I ended up with a storm of paper and materials and tools strewn around me, what a scene!

Take a look.

Here is the work as I finished it in my 12 x 9 sketchbook. I was not satisfied with it but I guess I only worked an hour or so on it, after all.

I thought I looked a bit ghoulish in this picture. I also was not happy with the wall behind my head – I felt it should be more shadowed so that the lamplight would show up more, and so that the nice white bedspread could stand out. I worked things over a tiny bit more the next day.

All right, this is better now. I look a whole lot more friendly in this picture, and I think the atmosphere of being enclosed with a book comes across better.

Well, what do you know? I would not have thought of depicting this scene without this workshop reminding me of this part of my life. Thank you to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, for this really nice experience. I’m looking forward to the next workshop!

Tiny House 7

You may remember me mentioning a visit with a good friend, Diane, back in April. I made her a Tiny House and she took it home with her to North Carolina. On her way there, she stopped at her daughter and son-in-law’s house in Maryland for a few days, and she showed the Tiny House to their son, her small grandson.

She told me he was intrigued by it. I remembered how much I liked Tiny Houses when I was young (although none we ever made were very elaborate, mostly being shoeboxes with windows and doors cut in them and decorated with crayons, etc.).

The idea came to us that he might like a Tiny House of his own. So I got to work. I made it a bit larger than I usually make Tiny Houses, thinking he would want to have plenty of room for whatever toys and purposes he might want to put it to. I also tried to make it extra well constructed – though with this kind of building, some tape and paint will fix everything.

Also, I thought he might like some interesting features – so I added an attic and a balcony.

All right, let’s see this Tiny House! Here you see the basic front and back view.

Here are some more views of the overall house from different angles.

Here are some of the features – starting with the front door:

And here is a window:

Some balcony details (and by the way, the balcony was constructed from the bottom of a cereal box):

The garden and its path:

A person who was passing by:

And here are detail images of the interior. As you can see, there are four rooms and an attic. Plenty of room!

And here are some various details of the house.

OK, that’s it! I shipped the house to Maryland and that is where it is now.