Tag Archives: art

Spring Arrives

Here is another painting done during my online class at Woodmere Art Museum comparing Eastern and Western art. I composed another picture featuring a tree in the foreground, but this time I have a figure involved, too.

As a note, this painting is a reworking (on a major scale) of a painting I did last summer in the landscape class I took. You may remember I enjoyed being in that class but I did not like doing landscapes. So, I’ve been renovating those paintings into something new and this is one of them. Here is the earlier painting for comparison.

Quite a difference, right? Well, I’m satisfied with where this painting’s journey has ended up and I don’t think I’ll be making any more changes.

Spring Arrives, 18″ x 24″, on Masonite.

Collage and Memories

Last week I attended an online workshop at the National Gallery Art as part of their Virtual Studio series. You may remember I’ve done several of these sessions. They are offered every couple of weeks and are free. I’m a real fan of these classes and have enjoyed myself in each one.

Here is the email address to put yourself on the list for notifications about future events : virtualstudio@nga.gov .

On this afternoon, the theme was Storytelling with Collage (look here for the description of the program). I was interested to see what we’d be doing because as you know, I have spent a lot of my art career in doing collage and I always want to learn more.

First of all, we selected a memory that we’d like to depict in collage – any memory or experience, a big theme or a small moment. I was not prepared to come up with something and panicked. Then, I thought of the activity that is my lifelong favorite: reading. I am an avid reader and once I learned to read I have gone full speed ahead, often reading one book a day (sometimes more).

We then spent a few minutes writing down phrases or sketching pictures to support this memory theme. During this time, I found a focus: I especially love to read in bed and I have been doing it since childhood. I decided to depict me in bed with a book.

Next, we spent some time looking at a collage by Romare Bearden titled Tomorrow I May Be Far Away. Click here to see it in the museum’s collection.

Then, we started to work on our collages, with the instructor guiding us through the process. Since I was familiar with working in this medium, I listened, but mostly I worked really really fast on my image. I’m usually messy when I work in collage, but on this occasion I outdid myself – I was discarding papers on the floor and cutting and pasting and moving so quickly that I ended up with a storm of paper and materials and tools strewn around me, what a scene!

Take a look.

Here is the work as I finished it in my 12 x 9 sketchbook. I was not satisfied with it but I guess I only worked an hour or so on it, after all.

I thought I looked a bit ghoulish in this picture. I also was not happy with the wall behind my head – I felt it should be more shadowed so that the lamplight would show up more, and so that the nice white bedspread could stand out. I worked things over a tiny bit more the next day.

All right, this is better now. I look a whole lot more friendly in this picture, and I think the atmosphere of being enclosed with a book comes across better.

Well, what do you know? I would not have thought of depicting this scene without this workshop reminding me of this part of my life. Thank you to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, for this really nice experience. I’m looking forward to the next workshop!

Sycamore

I did this painting while attending an online class comparing Eastern and Western art at the Woodmere Museum, back in March 2022. One of the characteristics of Asian art we discussed involved the use of an element in the foreground, very large, with the other parts of the scene arrayed behind it.

I have used this technique often in the past, but usually for me it involved placing a figure in this position. This time I tried it out with a tree.

“Sycamore”, 3/22, 20″ x 16″” on Masonite.

Large Artist Sketchbook 2021 Pages 55 and 56

Here’s another one of my artist sketchbooks for you to see. It was finished in May of 2021 but the artworks were done over the previous year or so, I guess. I’ll be showing you page spreads, one each week, for as long as the book goes on.

As you know, I make these books for my own enjoyment. I work on a page as the inclination strikes me and I never have a plan for the book or for the artwork that goes into it. There is no theme, no meaning, other than what each image shows the viewer and the viewer takes away from the experience.

In this book I did artwork on the front and back of each page. There’s nothing written associated with the images, and the images paired in each page spread do not relate to each other in any way except for being side by side.

I hope you enjoy looking at this book!

Today’s images are the last two pages of the book. You’ve seen the whole thing. If you want to check back into the past to review the book, I published images every Friday for I guess the last 6 or 7 months or so – just scroll back in the posts. Or, search under the category Artist Books.

Thank you so much for following along.

*********

Here is the page spread for today:

And here are the individual pages.

Sketch Animals and People as They Move

In March/April 2022, I took an online sketching class at GoggleWorks Center for the Arts in Reading, PA. I was looking for an opportunity to get myself back into drawing. My eye problems of summer and fall 2021 into early 2022 had shaken my confidence in my ability to see well enough to do pen and ink drawing, and I thought a regular schedule of sketching would be good to start me moving again.

The class was a lot of fun, the instructor was great, and my goal was met – I did a lot of drawing and I enjoyed myself. I’ll show you what I worked on in a series of posts.
Thanks to my instructor, Zoungy Kligge, and my classmates for a good experience.

In this session of class, our assignment was to sketch animals and people in motion, the hardest thing for our last class! During class, we peeked in through several webcams and observed cows in a field, sheep in a barn, and people walking on a beach. Take a look.

***

This picture shows you a couple of cows. I did some sheep pictures too, but to be honest, the sheep looked like anything but sheep. It’s not that easy to draw animals in motion!

This picture is a lady walking on the beach. I did a lot of people pictures. I found it hard, once again, to work fast enough to get anything good. I will need to practice this skill.

*******

I will end with a stationary subject – my cat, who slept through each one of these classes in a chair by my side. Yes, he did. Here he is, semi-sitting up and asleep.

Well, that’s the end of my tour through my sketching class work. I hope to be able to do another class along these lines. It is a lot of fun to sketch with other people and to try subjects I might have otherwise ignored or felt hesitant about attempting.

Happy Sketching!

Sketch Nature

In March/April 2022, I took an online sketching class at GoggleWorks Center for the Arts in Reading, PA. I was looking for an opportunity to get myself back into drawing. My eye problems of summer and fall 2021 into early 2022 had shaken my confidence in my ability to see well enough to do pen and ink drawing, and I thought a regular schedule of sketching would be good to start me moving again.

The class was a lot of fun, the instructor was great, and my goal was met – I did a lot of drawing and I enjoyed myself. I’ll show you what I worked on in a series of posts.
Thanks to my instructor, Zoungy Kligge, and my classmates for a good experience.

In this session of class, our assignment was to sketch nature. Nature! What a big subject. I decided to choose a couple of images of things close to home.

***

This picture shows a group of imaginary trees drawn in class. We practiced capturing the forms and shapes of trees as our instructor gave us tips on how to do so.

This picture depicts a real tree – I liked the tangled branches it has. It’s located near a walking path in Plymouth Meeting, PA.

This picture is a stylized tree. I was just enjoying making shapes and forms inside a tree structure.

This picture is of some of my favorite flowers – dandelions.

Sketch Personal Memories Part Three

In March/April 2022, I took an online sketching class at GoggleWorks Center for the Arts in Reading, PA. I was looking for an opportunity to get myself back into drawing. My eye problems of summer and fall 2021 into early 2022 had shaken my confidence in my ability to see well enough to do pen and ink drawing, and I thought a regular schedule of sketching would be good to start me moving again.

The class was a lot of fun, the instructor was great, and my goal was met – I did a lot of drawing and I enjoyed myself. I’ll show you what I worked on in a series of posts.
Thanks to my instructor, Zoungy Kligge, and my classmates for a good experience.

I continue with the images I made for this session of class, in which our assignment was to sketch personal memories. In doing so, we record feelings in tangible form.

***

This picture depicts the manual typewriter used by my mother in college in the 1950’s and then by me in the 1970’s (though I eventually got an electric machine). I learned to type on this typewriter. When my mother died, I asked to have it and now it’s here in my own house, a treasured old friend.

This picture depicts a display of books I chose for our local library. I won a raffle to choose the theme and volumes for a month-long presentation on this kiosk. If you want to know more, I wrote a post about the experience and show photos of the display here.

I love to read and I love the library. This image symbolizes for me the infinite pleasure there is to be found in reading and learning. And a thank you to the people who help me do that at every library I go to.

Large Artist Sketchbook 2021 Pages 53 and 54

Here’s another one of my artist sketchbooks for you to see. It was finished in May of 2021 but the artworks were done over the previous year or so, I guess. I’ll be showing you page spreads, one each week, for as long as the book goes on.

As you know, I make these books for my own enjoyment. I work on a page as the inclination strikes me and I never have a plan for the book or for the artwork that goes into it. There is no theme, no meaning, other than what each image shows the viewer and the viewer takes away from the experience.

In this book I did artwork on the front and back of each page. There’s nothing written associated with the images, and the images paired in each page spread do not relate to each other in any way except for being side by side.

I hope you enjoy looking at this book!

Here is the page spread for today:

And here are the individual pages.

Sketch Personal Memories Part Two

In March/April 2022, I took an online sketching class at GoggleWorks Center for the Arts in Reading, PA. I was looking for an opportunity to get myself back into drawing. My eye problems of summer and fall 2021 into early 2022 had shaken my confidence in my ability to see well enough to do pen and ink drawing, and I thought a regular schedule of sketching would be good to start me moving again.

The class was a lot of fun, the instructor was great, and my goal was met – I did a lot of drawing and I enjoyed myself. I’ll show you what I worked on in a series of posts.
Thanks to my instructor, Zoungy Kligge, and my classmates for a good experience.

I continue with the images I made for this session of class, in which our assignment was to sketch personal memories. In doing so, we record feelings in tangible form.

***

This picture depicts our family’s stopwatch. Between the ages of 7 and 17, I was a competitive swimmer, starting out in a summer league and by the time I finished competing, I swam for a team participating in national-level events. In the 1960’s and 1970’s, before there was electronic timing, every family had a stopwatch to record their swimmer(s)’s splits and times as they watched in the stands. And, since all meets were hand-timed, that also meant the official timers (three to each lane and volunteers from the host club or spectators, usually parents) used their own watches.

The watch was run by my mother (my father was unreliable at starting or stopping it; you could not trust his results). I can picture her sitting in the stands with the other parents, holding a heat sheet and timing every heat. All the parents ran their watches all the time. In every event somebody’s kid was swimming, and if you wanted to keep up with the rankings as the event unfolded, you had to time the heats yourself. You timed their kids and they timed yours. This was especially helpful when you got excited at a close race and forgot to stop or start the watch.

When my mother died, I asked to have this watch, and it is here at home with me. It still runs perfectly.