Tag Archives: art

Flash Fiction February 2023 is right around the corner

Where I live, this time of year can often be cold, dark, rainy, snowy. Great for staying inside and reading.

Or maybe where you are, it’s sunny and hot. Great for sitting outside and reading.

Let me suggest an idea: wherever you are, it’s always perfect weather for reading.

So it’s a good thing that Flash Fiction February 2023 at Fictive Dream is coming along soon.

You know what I am talking about. Each February, Fictive Dream, which is an online magazine devoted to the short story, presents one flash fiction story each day of the month. For the past several years I have been doing illustrations for the event.

I’ve done the artwork for this year’s event as well. I created a body of abstract work and editor Laura Black chose individual pieces with one to represent each story. I’ll be showing you the artwork each day and providing a link to the story. I hope you’ll take a look at the art and then click to the story.

I love the connection between words and art that occurs in this event. I am honored to be involved with it. Thank you as always to Fictive Dream and Laura Black, and to all the authors whose stories entertain, provoke thought, and evoke emotion.

See you on February 1st!

Chapter Nine: Abstract to Divergence

In the fall of 2022 I participated in studio painting sessions at Woodmere Museum of Art. The class was called Exploring Abstraction and was led by Val Rossman. If any of this information sounds familiar it is because I have done previous sessions in the studio with this group. And that’s because I like being there!

Here are the three beginnings I made:

One of the beginnings chose to upend itself and try anew from that angle:

And then the beginnings resolved themselves, in very different ways.

Take a look at before and after.

Chapter Eight: Abstract to “We’ve Been Friends for a Long Time”

In the fall of 2022 I participated in studio painting sessions at Woodmere Museum of Art. The class was called Exploring Abstraction and was led by Val Rossman. If any of this information sounds familiar it is because I have done previous sessions in the studio with this group. And that’s because I like being there!

Now there is only one painting left to move on with, in this grouping – the one on the far right.

I had no idea what I wanted to do. So I turned it upside down, like this:

After messing around with it some more, I got an idea in my head of three chairs, and a starry sky. No idea where that came from, but that is what I painted. I made a start on it in class and finished up at home. Here is where it landed.

Truly this sequence of creative events was a more convoluted path than usual in terms of where it started and where it ended up. But I like the way it turned out. Sometimes the painting tells you what it wants to do and refuses to be deterred.

“We’ve Been Friends For a Long Time”, acrylics and acrylic marker, 11/22, 20″ x 16″.

Small Artist Sketchbook 2022 – Pages 30 and 31

We are on a journey through another one of my small artist sketchbooks. As with all my books of this type, I take a sketchbook and fill it with whatever I feel like doing at the time. No planning, just enjoyment.

This book was done between August 2020 and February 2022, more or less (I date each page as I do it).

I don’t go through the book page by page in order, though in general the earlier images are at the front and the later ones following – but sometimes I skip pages and come back later, or do some other thing. No reason, that is just how I do it.

Let’s take a look.

Here’s today’s page spread. A sofa with a dual personality, and next to it some faces.

Here are individual views of the pages.

If you have any questions as to the materials or techniques I used, let me know. I love to answer questions!

Chapter Seven: Abstract to “Gathering In, Letting Go”

In the fall of 2022 I participated in studio painting sessions at Woodmere Museum of Art. The class was called Exploring Abstraction and was led by Val Rossman. If any of this information sounds familiar it is because I have done previous sessions in the studio with this group. And that’s because I like being there!

You might remember that I said in my last post on these paintings that I thought there were a couple that were finished. I took them to class for another opinion. One was fine as it was. Done.

The other, just a little tweak… Val saw the same adjustments I had identified, so I took my brush in hand and, then as you know, sometimes things take an unexpected turn. By the end of the session, I had gone in a whole other direction. *

That was ok. I took the painting home and finished it.

Why did this happen? I have an idea.

In the studio we had been talking about memories of fall, and I mentioned one involving my grandmother and me as a very little girl. My grandmother’s yard had many trees, and our house, set in the middle of a former farm field, had none. In the fall, I felt it very keenly that we had no mounds of fallen leaves surrounding it as my grandparents’ house did.

My way to fix that was to take some home from their house and scatter them in our yard. My grandmother helped me gather up a bagful and I went home fully confident that I’d be covering the lawn with them. Imagine my shock (and I still remember this moment, how it felt) when I emptied out the bag and realized my offerings made not a dent in the empty space of our yard.

What kept me from being utterly downcast at this sight, and what I remember now, is how patiently my grandmother helped me, letting me know she appreciated my initiative and desire to solve a problem. Because of that I knew it was a good idea, I gave it a try, it was just a bigger job than I had thought!

So I think the painting became what it is because of this memory. It’s called “Gathering In, Letting Go”.

“Gathering In, Letting Go” acrylics and acrylic marker, 20″ x 16″, 11/22.

*the painting I started off with is the one in the middle.

Chapter Six: Abstract to “Clever”

In the fall of 2022 I participated in studio painting sessions at Woodmere Museum of Art. The class was called Exploring Abstraction and was led by Val Rossman. If any of this information sounds familiar it is because I have done previous sessions in the studio with this group. And that’s because I like being there!

Well, here we go again. I’ve thoroughly bought into the idea of multiples. As I said earlier, that’s how I work most of the time anyway, so…no decision. Multiples.

By now in the studio I’ve hit my stride after a slow start, and I feel happy and in the flow of painting. In each session, I settle in quickly and get to work. I have finished up those earlier paintings and I’m ready to start on a new set.

I decided to begin in a way that works well for me: paint and draw and do whatever I feel like, just fill up the canvas. Then I have something to work with, rather than a blank expanse of white canvas glaring at me.

Here is what I had at the end of a session. You can see that I photographed them on my table – my legs and feet are peeking in at the bottom of the pictures!

I went home and did a little more scrawling on them. There were a couple of them that I thought looked pretty good at that point. Could they be finished? I took them to class and asked Val what she thought. Yes, she agreed, there was one that was all done.

Kind of a departure for me, this one. But I like it.

“Clever”, 20″ x 16″, acrylics and acrylic markers, 11/22.

Chapter Five: Abstract to Two Fully-Constructed Homes

In the fall of 2022 I participated in studio painting sessions at Woodmere Museum of Art. The class was called Exploring Abstraction and was led by Val Rossman. If any of this information sounds familiar it is because I have done previous sessions in the studio with this group. And that’s because I like being there!

In a recent post in this series I showed you a painting of my house and I told you that I did another one, simultaneously, on the same subject. I guess I was fulfilling both the idea of “multiples” and “landscape” that Val had mentioned as themes, in one fell swoop.

I worked on them side by side, painting first on the one and then the other. They are not twins; more like cousins, I guess. Here they are together:

My house is a mid-century modern split level with a lot of trees and bushes in front. The driveway comes right to the garage on the right side of the house, and there is a big picture window to the left. Another feature of the house is a large chimney in the middle of the roof.

In the first picture, I’ve parked my little car in the driveway and my living room is on view through the window. In the second one, I’ve depicted me bringing in a letter from the mailbox, and I’ve shown the details of the stepping stones in the yard. In both pictures I have included a large three-trunk birch tree on the left front.

I like the way these turned out. I love my house and I feel my area is a great place to live.

Here are the two paintings each on its own. Each is 20″ x 16″ on canvas.

At Home

Here You Find Me At Home

Chapter Four: Abstract to Transformations

In the fall of 2022 I participated in studio painting sessions at Woodmere Museum of Art. The class was called Exploring Abstraction and was led by Val Rossman. If any of this information sounds familiar it is because I have done previous sessions in the studio with this group. And that’s because I like being there!

Here is a gallery of the three abstract paintings I used as starting points along with their finished versions.

Small Artist Sketchbook 2022 – Pages 28 and 29

We are on a journey through another one of my small artist sketchbooks. As with all my books of this type, I take a sketchbook and fill it with whatever I feel like doing at the time. No planning, just enjoyment.

This book was done between August 2020 and February 2022, more or less (I date each page as I do it).

I don’t go through the book page by page in order, though in general the earlier images are at the front and the later ones following – but sometimes I skip pages and come back later, or do some other thing. No reason, that is just how I do it.

Let’s take a look.

Here’s today’s page spread. First, my stove top; the other, something abstract.

Here are individual views of the pages.

If you have any questions as to the materials or techniques I used, let me know. I love to answer questions!

Chapter Three: Abstract to “At Home”

In the fall of 2022 I participated in studio painting sessions at Woodmere Museum of Art. The class was called Exploring Abstraction and was led by Val Rossman. If any of this information sounds familiar it is because I have done previous sessions in the studio with this group. And that’s because I like being there!

Well, some time passed, and I did some other projects, and then Val gave us another suggestion: landscapes.

I’m not much on landscapes in the traditional sense ( I tend to drift off into Trees Trees Trees Sky Green Stuff Brown Stuff Trees …), but in this case, the idea was to take some element of landscape, macro to micro view, and see what we could do with it.

For some reason, I was interested in painting my front yard and my house. I have no idea where that thought came from, but I decided to go with it.

You know which painting I pulled out to work with: Example #3.

I worked on this painting simultaneously with another painting of the same subject. Again, I don’t know why I did that; in fact, I don’t think I have ever painted two versions of the same thing at the same time.

I’ll show you both paintings together in another post. For now, here is what I finished up with. I did most of it in the studio and the rest at home over the next few days.

“At Home”. Acrylics and acrylic marker, 20″ x 16″.

*********

Here is a gallery of the before and afters, just for fun.