Tag Archives: acrylics

Grid Look

Here’s a painting that evolved from something I started at one of my recent classes, but it’s ended up nothing like it started out.

I called it “Grid Look” because of the structure of the image: I like thinking about whether I am looking in through a window or out. I guess it can go either way; I like that.

The painting is 20″ x 16″ and is acrylics on canvas, with some acrylic marker here and there, I think.

Commuter Crowd

This fall I have been taking an online class at Woodmere Art Museum (this class is different from the studio sessions I attend in person). We are focusing on women artists from different areas of the world.

I enjoy learning about the artists and am particularly interested in their life stories and why they create the art that they do. I have chosen this focus for my own work in this class. Sometimes it has been a more literal expression of my memories or experiences, as in this painting. I was thinking of the years I worked in Center City Philadelphia, and how it felt to be going to the train station with the crowds in the evening, on a hot summer day, let’s say.

This painting is called “Commuter Crowd” and is done in acrylics on canvas, 20″ x 16″, October, 2022.

My Thoughts Just Got Away From Me

This fall I’ve been participating in a studio painting group at Woodmere Art Museum, located not far from home. We focus on abstract work in these sessions. Here is something I started in class and finished up at home, as is my usual practice.

It’s called “My Thoughts Just Got Away From Me” and is done in acrylics and acrylic markers on board, 20″ x 16″. I used this opportunity to go all-out on patterns and colors and shapes.

After three years…

Yesterday, August 27, 2022, I participated in the Lansdale Festival of the Arts in Lansdale, PA. It’s the first show I’ve done since the pandemic started and it’s three years since I was last at this location in August, 2019. The show was canceled in 2020 for the pandemic and last year for bad weather, so we were happy to have a hot sunny day for this year’s date.

I’ve pretty much stopped doing shows, and I don’t know when I’ll be at another one. So I’ll tell you a little about it.

As background, I have a long history at this show – I think I first attended it in 1996, maybe. It’s held in a park and is a well-run easy-going event, always one of my favorite places to exhibit.

Friday night we packed up the car. Since I am not doing shows regularly, we had gotten rid of our old big car and found a new car since our last outing, and it’s much smaller. It took us some time to pack up this new car, Jen McGill her name is, and get her ready to take us to the show.

A bit squeezed in, we arrived at the park about 7:45 AM and were directed to Space 31.

First thing, get the tent set up. And then the racks, and unload the artwork from the car.

Next, put the covers on the racks. Start arranging the artwork. Set up the table for small works. Then clear off the chairs so we can sit down and we’re all done.

Here is a view of the various panels in the display. It’s always a challenge to put the art in places so that each piece looks well and fits in with its surrounding pieces. Sometimes this is hard with the variety of colors and patterns I fill each piece with – I don’t want people to have trouble picking individual pieces out of the crowd.

Once settled in the day went well. I felt as if I had never been away from the show world. It helped that the setting and many of the exhibitors were familiar to me, as well as the show organizers.

By chance I posted this piece yesterday:

I displayed it at this show, as you can see in the above photos. And guess what, it won third prize in my category, Acrylics, Oil, and Mixed Media. That was a nice surprise.

Well, that’s about it for the show. We had a nice day, a lot of pleasant conversations, made some sales, and managed to re-pack Jen McGill and fit ourselves into our spaces for the trip home. Once we got home and unpacked, we settled down for our traditional after-show dinner, pizza.

Thank you to everyone at the Lansdale Festival of the Arts who made this show possible.

My Neighbors: Revisit Three

A while back I went through my collection of paintings and picked out ones that I didn’t feel were quite finished, or had gotten to their true personality. Some of them I didn’t want to revisit and I donated them to the charity shop or else threw them out. And the ones I felt a connection to, however faint, I got to work in trying to pull more out of the picture. I will show you a small selection of three paintings that went through this process.

Here’s the original version. I did this one back in fall of 2020.

I was not satisfied with this picture from the time I made it, but I did like the intensity of color, so I did not paint over it then. I do remember that in composing it, I made some decisions, developed some “favorite areas” in the painting that I did not want to change, and breaking my own rule, got too attached and forced the rest of the painting into fitting with them. I also wanted more detail and liveliness in the picture.

Here it is after my work. Once again I kept the basic structure but added more paint, did a lot of work with my acrylic markers, and went crazy filling up every inch with a lot of pattern and line.

Well, now I am happy with things here. There is a sense of things happening, and I like that.

Here’s a quick overview of the three paintings and their current looks. Sometimes it just takes time to get to the place where things are as they should be, doesn’t it?

I Marvel: Revisit Two

A while back I went through my collection of paintings and picked out ones that I didn’t feel were quite finished, or had gotten to their true personality. Some of them I didn’t want to revisit and I donated them to the charity shop or else threw them out. And the ones I felt a connection to, however faint, I got to work in trying to pull more out of the picture. I will show you a small selection of three paintings that went through this process.

Here’s the original version.

As in the painting I showed in an earlier post, I Reach Out in Hope, I felt I had not gotten the depth of color I wanted and I thought the painting needed more punch. I also wanted there to be more elements in the picture.

Here it is after my work. I kept the basic structure but added more paint, did a lot of work with my acrylic markers, and revised the composition to put in a house and to define the sky.

Now I am at peace with this picture and I feel it says what I want it to say.

I Reach Out in Hope: Revisit One

A while back I went through my collection of paintings and picked out ones that I didn’t feel were quite finished, or had gotten to their true personality. Some of them I didn’t want to revisit and I donated them to the charity shop or else threw them out. And the ones I felt a connection to, however faint, I got to work in trying to pull more out of the picture. I will show you a small selection of three paintings that went through this process.

Here’s the original version.

I felt I had not gotten the depth of color I wanted and I thought the painting lacked any…drama?

Here it is after my work. I kept the basic structure but added more paint, and I also did a lot of work with my acrylic markers.

OK, now I’m happier. Mission accomplished!

I’ll Wait for You by the Big Tree

Here is another painting done while attending the online class I took at Woodmere Museum back in March 2022. We were focusing on Eastern/Western art and comparing characteristics of the two. This is another painting featuring a large tree in the foreground. Again with a figure. And this time with a crowd of people coming in and out of the picture.

It’s called I’ll Wait for You by the Big Tree and it is 14″ x 11″ on masonite, done in March 2022.

Spring Arrives

Here is another painting done during my online class at Woodmere Art Museum comparing Eastern and Western art. I composed another picture featuring a tree in the foreground, but this time I have a figure involved, too.

As a note, this painting is a reworking (on a major scale) of a painting I did last summer in the landscape class I took. You may remember I enjoyed being in that class but I did not like doing landscapes. So, I’ve been renovating those paintings into something new and this is one of them. Here is the earlier painting for comparison.

Quite a difference, right? Well, I’m satisfied with where this painting’s journey has ended up and I don’t think I’ll be making any more changes.

Spring Arrives, 18″ x 24″, on Masonite.

Sycamore

I did this painting while attending an online class comparing Eastern and Western art at the Woodmere Museum, back in March 2022. One of the characteristics of Asian art we discussed involved the use of an element in the foreground, very large, with the other parts of the scene arrayed behind it.

I have used this technique often in the past, but usually for me it involved placing a figure in this position. This time I tried it out with a tree.

“Sycamore”, 3/22, 20″ x 16″” on Masonite.